Bob Peschel

2021 Inductee
Bob Peschel grew up far from the Badger State, but his love for hockey began in his native New Jersey, where he learned to play on the frozen pond, and where he learned how to become the grinder, a title that he would carry on into his future life.

Judy Ferwerda

2021 Inductee
There can be no discussion about girls hockey and the growth of girls hockey without the subject of Madison native Judy Ferwerda being brought into that discussion.

Cal Roadhouse

2021 Inductee
Cal Roadhouse was born in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada and grew up playing hockey in Calgary.  As a player, he was a member of the Wichita Wind of the Central Hockey League, and then played in the International Hockey League for the Milwaukee Admirals.

Tom Doyle

2021 Inductee
Dr. Tom Doyle was born in Mineral Point, Wis., and raised in the throes of the Depression. Organized hockey and money to pay for it didn’t exist at that time, but Doyle learned to skate and play hockey on the Point Brewery Pond.
  • Judy Ferwerda - 2021
There can be no discussion about girls hockey and the growth of girls hockey without the subject of Madison native Judy Ferwerda being brought into that discussion.  A person who has interest in any and all athletics, Ferwerda’s dedication to the birth and growth of girls hockey and to the cause of females in sports is legendary.  
 
Ferwerda’s relentless dedication to girls hockey helped jump start the sport at Tier I, and has led the explosion in numbers at Tier II.  She and her husband Dave founded the Wisconsin Challengers in the mid-1990s.  For many girls, the Challengers was their first opportunity to play for an all-girls hockey team.  Prior to that, there were few, if any, opportunities for girls, and those were, for the most part, only on boys teams.  Ultimately, the Challengers would evolve into the Madison Capitols girls program, but, more than that, it would create opportunities for these young women to participate in high school, collegiate Division I and Division III programs, the US National Team and eventually the US Olympic Team.

The journey for Ferwerda and her family was personal and involved a lot of time, energy and resources of their own as girls traveled from all over Wisconsin and the Midwest to practice or compete in Madison in the early days.  As one supporter of her induction put it “”Gas, miles and time became the Ferwerda’s currency, in exchange to create opportunities for us to play the game we love.”

Ferwerda and her husband Dave live in Madison and have two daughters, Jess and Amanda.